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Locations

Contributed By Michelle Christensen

Production insurance should be obtained from a reputable company. You cannot run a professional, above board production without insurance. If you operate without insurance, you are not only risking lawsuits for damage to property and equipment but also liability if someone is injured on your set. Without insurance, you will not be able to rent equipment, negotiate location contracts or obtain permits.

At this point, the Production Designer is hired onto the crew. The UPM, 1st AD and Production Designer will scout locations. This may be as simple as renting a sound stage or as complex as finding the "perfect" secluded road or warehouse. If the site of the production is not nearby, Location Scouts in that area can be hired to find potential locations to cut down on wasted travel time. The Director, DP and Sound Mixer (see related article on scouting locations for sound) will usually make the final location decision once the preliminary search is done (budget restrictions may apply). Often the Driving Captain and the Construction Coordinator will assist in scouting locations because of the logistics of moving a large crew and equipment around. Location contracts should be obtained and signed. Some locations may require permits either by the city or county, so check with the local city council or film office for details.

The production coordinator is usually one of the last people to join a production team. The coordinator handles the production problems, large and small as well as coordinates the catering, product placement, equipment rental, securing of locations, obtaining permits, finding large props (cars and boats). The production coordinator is usually in the office answering questions about the production and relaying information to the department heads and other crew members. This person must be competent and efficient for the production to stay on schedule and on budget.

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